Apocalypse Delayed

A problem distilled by admin:

“Extend-and-pretend” — or radically finite reality denial — is an engine of catastrophe. It enables negative consequences to be accumulated through postponement . . .

Yet the accumulation is a slow one, so perhaps there is no reason to expect a singular catastrophe recognizable as such. We’re not talking about volcanoes and meteorites but large-scale economic, social, and political phenomena. In the context of such phenomena, catastrophe, in Eliot’s words, may be a slow whimper until we run out of breath rather than a cataclysmic bang with an instantaneous reckoning.

Catastrophe—finally hitting the wall of reality—may in the end be local, diffuse, an ongoing yet controllable thing. The politics of the last decade might be read not as “extend and pretend” but as “scatter the negative consequences.” Shifting the metaphor, we should not ask “When does the pressure finally explode?” but “How do governments (and their functionaries) release steam at the margins?” Of course, we can also ask, “Where does the steam escape on its own, regardless of planned release?” The Cathedral is not stupid; perhaps it doesn’t let negative consequences accumulate so much as cook the books, fudge the ledgers, and move money between accounts (shifting metaphors again). State and federal policy as an endless series of maneuvers designed to keep the Good Ship Society afloat indefinitely, water flooding in through a thousand small holes but pumped out again through a thousand more poked by the shipbuilders.

Catastrophe is thus framed as a local event. Lehman Brothers goes bankrupt, the Fed prints more money. Another Detroit neighborhood loses electric power, another D.C. neighborhood gentrifies thanks to federal salaries. Or, in the social realm, a white Bosnian is killed in Ferguson, but now black Africans are “Christian terrorists.”

None of this is to say that a game of “scatter the negative consequences” can go on indefinitely, despite what its planners might think, anymore than a game of “extend and pretend” can go on indefinitely. But it is to say that the endgame exists, by design, on a much longer time scale than any of us realize.

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6 responses

  1. Pingback: Outside in - Involvements with reality » Blog Archive » Suspense

  2. Pingback: Apocalypse Delayed | Neoreactive

  3. Pingback: Apocalypse Delayed | Reaction Times

  4. Pingback: This Week in Reaction (2015/02/20) | The Reactivity Place

  5. Extend and Pretend often does lead to catastrophe, as long as there is an Outside. Barbarians, other states, natural disasters, maybe even climate change. They reveal the truth. Without them, maybe it’s just endless decline. At times, that is what Spengler seemed to predict for the West, that it would swallow the world and end in ever smaller and less productive populations, every more kleptocratic and ineffectual governments, until the race was gone. Exaggerated, no doubt.

    February 21, 2015 at 2:12 pm

  6. It exists for as long as we pretend it exists, and continue acting as if it exists. Once enough people begin acting as if it does not exist, it will collapse.

    Just be sure you know what you are going to do when that happens. Most people have no clue.

    February 22, 2015 at 9:41 pm

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