Justified

The Smithsonian has apparently been reading Steve Sailer . . .

The case of Iceland is an extreme one, but the idea that we are all distant cousins, in the scope of human history, is well accepted. A new study, published today in the journal PLOS Biology, explains this degree of relatedness in modern-day Europeans.

EDIT: Of course, as hbd chick reminds us, none of the information linked in the above article (or any of the articles about this new study) is terribly new information. What is new (and encouraging) is that Cathedral institutions are verifying and circulating the information in non-specialist forums even though said information contains obvious HBD implications.
Advertisements

4 responses

  1. “Of course, as hbd chick reminds us, none of the information linked in the above article (or any of the articles about this new study) is terribly new information.”

    what’s bothering me about all of today’s msm stories on this research is the (usual) pc-spin they’ve put on it: “all europeans are related! see? we’re just one big, happy family! and really the whole world is, too, if you go back far enough!”

    well, yes … and no.

    May 8, 2013 at 4:55 pm

    • . . . and the “and no” is more important for understanding humanity.

      I was at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum the other day, and I overheard a tour guide telling her group, “Humans share 99.9% of their genome with one another. It’s only .1% of genetic material that separates humans, so clearly racial differences don’t matter.”

      I really, really wanted to point out that humans share 90% of their genome with rats, too, so does that mean the differences between rats and humans don’t matter?

      PC-spin works because it’s not made of outright lies but rather carefully framed half-truths.

      May 8, 2013 at 5:08 pm

      • Thales

        “does that mean the differences between rats and humans don’t matter?”

        Yes, there are some individuals, particularly around the statehouse and the DC beltway, where the differences are negligible.

        May 9, 2013 at 4:20 pm

      • Ha! The Golden Rimshot Award goes to Thales.

        May 9, 2013 at 8:21 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s